Notes on the thought of Gordon H. Clark

Gordon Clark and the Problem of Evil

One of the most common arguments against orthodox Christianity is the so-called “Problem of Evil” (POE).  This argument is that there is supposed to be a logical contradiction in that these three particular doctrines are held in combination: 1. God is loving, 2. God is omnipotent (all powerful), and 3. There is evil in the …

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Epistemological Consistency and the Truth of Christianity

Two varying philosophies or worldviews will by nature discount or reject the alternative views. Thus, for example, Christianity denies naturalism and naturalism denies Christianity. From either perspective, either that of the Christian or that of the Naturalist, the alternative view is rejected. Thus it is not possible based on one view’s denial of another, to …

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On the Knowledge of God, Natural and Otherwise

The philosophical attempts to prove the existence of God are all failures. The cosmological, teleological, moral, ontological, and transcendental arguments for the existence of God all rely on logical fallacies, are thus false, and are nowhere to be found in the Bible. Rather, God’s existence is NOWHERE PROVEN, but EVERYWHERE ASSUMED in the scriptures. Although …

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Secular Morality

“Empiricism cannot establish any norm of morality. I am not saying that secular morality and Christian morality are different. A recent defense of abortion, a TV interview, was that the government should enforce only rational morality and not revelational morality. My point is that so-called “rational morality” does not exist. The reason should be easily understandable. …

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Robert L. Reymond and Sensory Experience

Robert L. Reymond discusses Gordon H. Clark’s philosophy in his book The Justification of Knowledge (Reformed and Presbyterian Publishing Co., 1979). Reymond says there are two areas in which he is in disagreement with Clark: “first, his limitation of ‘knowledge’ only to his basic axiom and to what by good and necessary consequence may be deduced …

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Clark, Van Til, and the Incomprehensibility of God

Although the discussion has been called a debate on the “incomprehensibility of God”, both Gordon Clark and Cornelius Van Til agreed that God is incomprehensible. By this, it is meant that no one does, or ever can, know God fully. The true nature of the debate is regarding the content of man’s knowledge and the …

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Gordon Clark and Billy Graham

Here is a recollection from Samuel Faircloth, a student in Gordon Clark’s Medieval Philosophy course at Wheaton College.  Billy Graham was also a student in the very same class. “Clark was a very systematic, philosophical, orthodox elder – Presbyterian elder. He objected to communion on campus.  He said communion belongs to the church. You shouldn’t …

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The Ocotillo is not a Cactus – On the Importance of Definitions

Properly defining terms is necessary for understanding.  In a Christian context, it is important to know the meaning of the terms worship, praise, and holy, etc.  Particularly challenging, and thus all the more necessary, is properly defining the term “person” as it relates to the Trinity.  Some of these terms, such as “holy” are used …

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